Armstrong World Industries, the company that is purchasing Architectural Components Group, Inc., is a leader in the manufacture and marketing of ceilings and walls for commercial and residential spaces, but interestingly enough, it had its beginning in … corks?

Jennifer Johnson, director of global corporate communications for Armstrong World Industries, reached out to The Mail last week to say a neighborly hello.

Johnson clarified that the company has been based in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, since 1909, and it intends to stay right there. However, it got its start in 1860 in Pittsburgh as a two-person cork-cutting shop. According to the history section of the Armstrong website, the first deliveries of hand-carved corks were made by wheelbarrow.

Johnson indicated that it was the byproduct of the carved corks that led to Armstrong’s building material innovation; the substance was a key ingredient in linoleum, one of the company’s earlier product lines.

According to Johnson, the company is active in manufacturing in several states, and the Marshfield manufacturing location will join a robust and resilient company when the planned purchase is complete.

The ACGI purchase will lead to a major expansion, rather than new construction, of the 900 George Street location, Johnson clarified.

The Mail will cover the acquisition in more detail in future stories.

A correction from the Jan. 30 story about ACGI’s work with Apple’s “mothership” headquarters: That facility is located in Cupertino, California, rather than in Seattle. We apologize for the mistake.

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